moving to a different country?

xSuperMario64x

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I know this is probably, like, not at all an idea place to ask for advice on this kind of thing, but I don't know anyone in my personal life who has gone through this experiences, so I would be interested in hearing the perspectives of others on here who may have.

foe the last six months or so, I've given thought to living in Ontario (I currently live in cornfield Ohio). I doubt it would happen any time soon, probably years down the road. the whys aren't really relevant, as I have given it quite a bit of thought already and I'll think on it even more over time. but the hows are important. the thing is, I assume that would be a pretty huge undertaking, and I don't know where to begin or what to even expect.

I'm sure a few people here have either gone through the experience of moving to a different country, or are potentially planning on doing so. what is/was your experience? do you have any recommendations? how long did the process take? did you have to do anything specific for it (like a citizenship test, etc)? anything else you want to make note of? I'm planning on doing a lot of this research on my own time, but if anyone here has experiences to share then I would love to hear about it. ๐Ÿ’–
 
I have not moved countries myself, but I live in Ontario and know several people who have immigrated here recently so I'm vaguely familiar with the process.

Unless you have a partner or immediate family member living in Canada who can sponsor you, your best bet is probably to immigrate as a skilled worker. Only certain professions are eligible (they're listed on this page), and it's preferred that you already have a job offer here prior to arrival. After being employed here for at least one year of full-time work, you can apply to become a permanent resident.

There are other ways to immigrate aside from being a skilled worker and they're all listed on this page.
 
i'm also an ontarian, was pretty much gonna say what cornimer said. were you looking into anywhere in ontario specifically? if it's anywhere in the southern or eastern parts i might have some insight on what it's like
 
I sent you a message. Iโ€™m not sure if itโ€™s exactly what youโ€™re looking for, but if it helps you even a little, Iโ€™m glad. I personally have experience moving within the US, but not out of the country. I donโ€™t even have a passport, haha.
 
I have not actually done it yet but wanted to offer support as someone else who lives in the U.S. and is looking to move to Ontario. I'll be moving to be with my girlfriend so I'm lucky in the sense that I have my partner there who could sponsor me down the road, but as we're not married and haven't lived together for a year yet to qualify as common law partners, I've looked a lot into some of the other possible ways to emigrate (mostly by getting another degree in Canada lol or as a skilled worker). Obviously I won't have as much insight as Canadians or people who already have immigrated before but it can be really confusing so feel free to shoot me a message if you wanna talk to someone who's trying to do this!

omg I forgot to mention that another option for people aged 18-35 is a young professional program! Most are available for citizens of other countries besides the U.S. but there are at least a couple I've found that are for U.S. citizens. You pay a fee and they help you to get an open work permit that allows you to live and work in Canada for a year (I think there are some differences in how it works between the provinces but this is how it goes if you wanna move to Ontario) and they also have resources to help you find a job and housing. It's not a direct path to permanent residency but it's another option to give you some leeway to be able to stay in the country and maybe try to find an employer or just to see how you feel about living there
 
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I immigrated to Australia via a prospective marriage visa; I moved here to be with my now husband! I had to wait about a year after applying before I could actually move to Australia.

There was a lot of paperwork involved but luckily it all got collated into one place online which made the process much simpler to deal with. Other than the usual application questions (Date of birth, place of birth, blah blah blah), we had to get family relatives/friends to write about our relationship, how long we knew eachother, etc. My partner and I also had to write about our relationship, answer a lot of questions, our plans for the future, etc. The application fee was.. pretty hefty but I was very extremely fortunate to have it paid by my mom ๐Ÿ˜… thanks mom

I didn't have to take any citizenship-type test (as I am yet to become a citizen to this day.. really gotta get around to doing that now that I am eligible). I don't think I even had to talk to any government official directly other than answer the usual questions in Customs at the airport. But I did have to get a background check done as well as a physical for some reason... and it could only be done at a place chosen/recognized by the immigration department, which was annoying because I had to travel to Atlanta for that. I also had to get passport-style pictures taken of me for the application.

Once I got approved, I packed my stuff up and flew to Australia. I did not bring a lot with me, just 2 big suitcases and shipped maybe one or two boxes. After we got married, I applied for a Partner visa -- I think that took maybe 6 months to a year to get approved? I don't quite remember. But the Partner visa application itself wasn't anywhere near as intensive as the Prospective Marriage visa application. My next step is the Citizenship application! Right now I am classified as a Permanent Resident.

No matter what application route you take though you will have to make sure to get all your documentation in order + scanned/photographed. There should be a number on the immigration website that you or a friend could call if you have any questions along the way when it comes to the application process (I hate making phone calls so I got my partner to ask them a lot of questions for me lmao)
 
thank you guys for the answers so far
๐Ÿฅบ๐Ÿ’•

I'll have to see if I can reply individually a little bit later (it's almost 2am here, I probably shouldn't be awake oops).
 
alright, I've gotten some more sleep, feeling a bit better, so I do have a few things I wanted to mention/ask.

@cornimer I did a filtered search on the website that you linked and looked up "lib" as in library/librarian, and I actually did find a few things there. I'm currently working as a circulation associate and I don't have a degree in library science, but I've actually contemplated getting one a few times in the past, as recently as a few months ago. I had considered for a moment what it might be like to go for something like that while living in Ontario, but I don't know if I'd want to go back to school. I'm just not sure if being a circ associate would cut it for what they are looking for.

@seliph I'm hoping to live near Toronto; maybe not in the city bc I know it's so expensive, though it would be nice. Anywhere within a 1-2 hour drive of there would be perfect. I've stayed in Mississauga both times that I visited, and I do like it there, but of course I wasn't quite there long enough to know what it's like to actually live there.

@Saylor partner sponsorships are hard because they have to be a permanent resident there and they have to be able to financially support you without govt assistance for a certain period of time. but hopefully that can work out for you. now that other thing you mentioned, the young professionals program, sounds intriguing. again, if the field I currently work in could qualify for that, then it's something I could look into.

@Millysaurusrexjr I know I've talked to you before about your experience and you're in Australia instead of Canada, but I always appreciate your insight. at least that way I can have a rough idea of what I could expect hehe ๐Ÿ˜Œ
 
No advice, as I havenโ€™t moved out of the country yet (hope to in the future so I can get my British passport and citizenship, since Nate, and subsequently Nicholas, have dual citizenship) but I just came to say that I think this was a great place to come to ask this question! Youโ€™re getting some great advice! ๐Ÿ˜Š
 
I don't know what it's like in the USA but I live an hour or so from Toronto and it has its issues. Low wages and high rent/cost of living. It obviously depends on your career on what the pay is but rent here is ridiculous and in high demand. Interest rates are insane on houses so buying is basically out of the question for now unless you're rich lol. And not to mention, the GTA is very overcrowded. Not to be all negative but I want you to be aware of that stuff. Again, maybe the USA is worse in that regard lol I'm not sure.
 
@seliph I'm hoping to live near Toronto; maybe not in the city bc I know it's so expensive, though it would be nice. Anywhere within a 1-2 hour drive of there would be perfect. I've stayed in Mississauga both times that I visited, and I do like it there, but of course I wasn't quite there long enough to know what it's like to actually live there.
i live in mississauga right now (and have for my whole life) and it's miserable, i'm actually excited to move out this summer lol. it's not that much cheaper than toronto but there's not nearly as many things to do so it's not worth it at all unless you really like walking in parks or going on drives imo
 
I don't know what it's like in the USA but I live an hour or so from Toronto and it has its issues. Low wages and high rent/cost of living. It obviously depends on your career on what the pay is but rent here is ridiculous and in high demand. Interest rates are insane on houses so buying is basically out of the question for now unless you're rich lol. And not to mention, the GTA is very overcrowded. Not to be all negative but I want you to be aware of that stuff. Again, maybe the USA is worse in that regard lol I'm not sure.
yeah, it's basically the same here. the housing market is ridiculous, that's why it's taking me so long to be able to get an apartment. I do work in the public sector and I make a decent wage even here, but I don't know how it compares to a similar job there. I'd have to do some research probably. I'm definitely aware of how ridiculous the rent is there, I don't even know how people afford to live in Toronto lol.
don't worry about being negative, I know it's not all positives and I don't want to go into this fully expecting everything to go smoothly or well honestly.

i live in mississauga right now (and have for my whole life) and it's miserable, i'm actually excited to move out this summer lol. it's not that much cheaper than toronto but there's not nearly as many things to do so it's not worth it at all unless you really like walking in parks or going on drives imo
I definitely get that, honestly the city I live in is so small and... narrow? I guess, idk how to describe it. but it's like a ghost town here. it's pretty lonely and you have to drive quite a ways to go anywhere and do something fun. one advantage that Mississauga has is it's ofc a bigger city; for reference, where I live the population is roughly 36,000. and I can't help but feel like a bigger city would have (relatively) more opportunities than where I live. but I trust that you know what you're talking about, and I appreciate you mentioning that so I can keep it in mind.
I know that Mississauga isn't the only option, thankfully. I think where I end up depends on where I can find a job.
 
yeah, it's basically the same here. the housing market is ridiculous, that's why it's taking me so long to be able to get an apartment. I do work in the public sector and I make a decent wage even here, but I don't know how it compares to a similar job there. I'd have to do some research probably. I'm definitely aware of how ridiculous the rent is there, I don't even know how people afford to live in Toronto lol.
don't worry about being negative, I know it's not all positives and I don't want to go into this fully expecting everything to go smoothly or well honestly.


I definitely get that, honestly the city I live in is so small and... narrow? I guess, idk how to describe it. but it's like a ghost town here. it's pretty lonely and you have to drive quite a ways to go anywhere and do something fun. one advantage that Mississauga has is it's ofc a bigger city; for reference, where I live the population is roughly 36,000. and I can't help but feel like a bigger city would have (relatively) more opportunities than where I live. but I trust that you know what you're talking about, and I appreciate you mentioning that so I can keep it in mind.
I know that Mississauga isn't the only option, thankfully. I think where I end up depends on where I can find a job.
Oooh, if you have a government job here, you're basically golden. They're the "dream" jobs people always talk about wanting here. Oh, minimum wage is going up from $16.55 to $17.30 in April 2024 apparently just as a reference point for wages so you don't get sucked into a job paying only $2 more than minimum but they require a 4 year bachelor's degree. I see that happening all the time on job postings... But yeah, Toronto is your best bet for higher wages, unless you get a government job somewhere. As a reference point, my old coworker got a job in Toronto for $34 an hour but job postings in the outside area (Newmarket, Markham, Vaughan, Richmond Hill, etc) for that same job is $18-21 an hour. Reading that you're coming from a smaller town and want something more, the GTA is definitely for you. I come from a town of 142,000 people and I find the GTA overwhelming haha. Lots of traffic but in turn, lots of cool activities, places to shop, and places to eat.
 
yeah, it's basically the same here. the housing market is ridiculous, that's why it's taking me so long to be able to get an apartment. I do work in the public sector and I make a decent wage even here, but I don't know how it compares to a similar job there. I'd have to do some research probably. I'm definitely aware of how ridiculous the rent is there, I don't even know how people afford to live in Toronto lol.
don't worry about being negative, I know it's not all positives and I don't want to go into this fully expecting everything to go smoothly or well honestly.


I definitely get that, honestly the city I live in is so small and... narrow? I guess, idk how to describe it. but it's like a ghost town here. it's pretty lonely and you have to drive quite a ways to go anywhere and do something fun. one advantage that Mississauga has is it's ofc a bigger city; for reference, where I live the population is roughly 36,000. and I can't help but feel like a bigger city would have (relatively) more opportunities than where I live. but I trust that you know what you're talking about, and I appreciate you mentioning that so I can keep it in mind.
I know that Mississauga isn't the only option, thankfully. I think where I end up depends on where I can find a job.
mississauga has gone way up in pricing and it seems to only be going up, iirc it just came out recently that it places right under toronto for most expensive ontarian cities to live. it's hardly livable unless you have roommates or family you're living with. it's a big city sure, but it pretty much revolves around square one - a big mall that's also only getting more and more expensive. even job opportunities are getting slim because aside from maybe food service, the what should be entry-level jobs popping up are at more high-end stores and they want that same type of experience. the job i just left was in oakville, and i worked there for 2-3 years 'cause i could barely find anything in my own city.

and that's coming from someone who's been here for 29 years, i used to love it here 'cause it was quiet and affordable and close to toronto, which i visit often. but it's been flipped on its head, it's trying to become a mini-toronto and in the process the people who've lived here their whole lives can't afford it anymore. one month's rent for a small single bedroom apartment is like 1.5k. honestly i don't recommend people with a single income to live in the greater toronto area at all unless they're really well off.
 
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honestly i don't recommend people with a single income to live in the greater toronto area at all unless they're really well off.
Yeah, I have to second this. Even though I have a FT job that pays above minimum wage, I still wouldn't begin to consider moving out on my own. I'd have nothing left after paying rent. I know several people who moved/are moving 2-4 hours outside of the GTA just to find something affordable.
 
Oooh, if you have a government job here, you're basically golden. They're the "dream" jobs people always talk about wanting here. Oh, minimum wage is going up from $16.55 to $17.30 in April 2024 apparently just as a reference point for wages so you don't get sucked into a job paying only $2 more than minimum but they require a 4 year bachelor's degree. I see that happening all the time on job postings... But yeah, Toronto is your best bet for higher wages, unless you get a government job somewhere. As a reference point, my old coworker got a job in Toronto for $34 an hour but job postings in the outside area (Newmarket, Markham, Vaughan, Richmond Hill, etc) for that same job is $18-21 an hour. Reading that you're coming from a smaller town and want something more, the GTA is definitely for you. I come from a town of 142,000 people and I find the GTA overwhelming haha. Lots of traffic but in turn, lots of cool activities, places to shop, and places to eat.
I always thought I would be overwhelmed in a big city like Toronto, or even Columbus for that matter. but I honestly love being in downtown Toronto, I don't mind the traffic and the apparent crowdedness is made up for by all the stuff you can do there. but yeah, I'll likely stay in the field of library science so I might see if I can do something with that there.

I think I have quite a few options now, just need to check out some stuff and try not to overwhelm myself with it. I feel like, one way or another, I'll find my feet back on the streets of Toronto somehow haha.

if I come up with any other questions/comments then I'll probably post them here, and if anyone else has anything more to say then feel free! thank you all for your input so far, I have quite a bit of optimism now ๐Ÿ’œ
 
For a while I was a weeaboo and wanted desperately to move to Japan because I thought it'd be better than the U.S. Then I realized my brain isn't capable of learning another language and heard the harsh realities of how immigrants are treated over there and gave up.

I thought about Canada for a while, but then I learned their housing crisis is considered by some even worse than the U.S. and Vancouver, Canada makes Seattle, one of the most expensive cities in the country, look cheap. I didn't want to go rural so I changed my mind.

After that I thought about New Zealand since it was so picturesque and known for having a high quality of living. Then I found out they still have an old law that makes it much harder for people with disabilities to immigrate there. That dream was gone.

England might be an option since the climate is similar to where I grew up and I already speak the language. I could never hope to afford London, but a different city is a possibility. I think the two things that stop me from trying to actually move would be moving from my currently aging and the fact I'm relying on disability services to find a job and I don't know if I'd be eligible for that if I left the U.S. Even a lot of states don't offer vocational rehabilitation. I'm already used to being far away from my irl friends, so that's not a huge deal.
 
I have given some thought as to how I could move to another country with how unstable my nation is becoming. I know that seems like a joke, but it's not. The warning signs are blaring. We can only hope that is avoided.

Alas, I'm pretty much locked in place. Moving to another country is complicated, and I'm not privileged enough, as I have a disability, am not wealthy, don't have any skills that are sought after, and am neurodivergent in at least one way. So my only recourse is moving to a blue state, surrounded by other blue states. And that's what I'm doing.

I'm thinking about going back to college for something different than I did and acquiring a skill that would make me desirable (but also that I like for myself) to a safer country, nevertheless, that will take a while.

If I could move, I'd want to move to Canada, one of the Scandinavian countries (maybe not Finland - too close to Russia!) or Germany.
 
I probably won't ever move to another nation, but I've considered moving to a different state.
 
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